14-Day Eviction Notice Form

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A 14-day eviction notice form gives tenants 14 days to either comply with the eviction notice and remain in the rental unit, or to move out of the rental unit within the 14-day notice period, and are typically used for evictions related to non-compliance with the lease, nonpayment of rent, termination of tenancy, or illegal activity.

Depending on the reason for eviction (and the state) tenants may or may not have the ability to cure (correct) a violation noted on a 14-day eviction notice.

Keep in mind that not all states require a written notice prior to beginning the eviction process.

14-Day Eviction Notices by State

The chart below indicates which states use 14-day eviction notices, what type of eviction the notice is used for, and whether tenants can cure the violation and remain in the rental unit.

State 14-Day Notice Used For: Ability to Cure?
Alaska Termination of tenancy (week-to-week) No
Arkansas Non-compliance Yes
Kentucky  Non-compliance If curable, must be corrected within 15 days
Maryland Imminent harm No
Massachusetts Nonpayment of rent Yes
Minnesota Nonpayment of rent (at-will tenants) No
Mississippi Non-compliance Yes (unless 2nd violation within 6 months)
Montana 1) Non-compliance other than property damage or unauthorized pets/people

2) Material health/safety violation

1) Yes

2) Yes

New York Nonpayment of rent Yes
South Carolina 1) Non-compliance

2) Health/safety violations

1) Yes

2) Yes

Tennessee 1) Non-compliance (1st violation)

2) Nonpayment of rent (1st violation)

1) Yes

2) Yes

Vermont 1) Illegal activity

2) Nonpayment of rent

1) No

2) Yes

Washington Nonpayment of rent Yes
Wisconsin Non-compliance (at-will tenants OR 2nd violation within 12 months for written leases) No

The Most Commonly Used 14-Day Eviction Notice Forms

The most common 14-day eviction notice forms are for:

  • Nonpayment of rent
  • Non-compliance
  • Illegal activity
  • Termination of tenancy

We take a look at each one in more detail below.

Nonpayment of Rent

An eviction notice form for nonpayment of rent explains that the tenant is past-due on their rent payments and will need to move out within a certain number of days.

Some states require the landlord to give tenants an opportunity to pay the overdue rent amount in order to avoid eviction. In that case, the notice should state that the tenant can pay the amount owed within the legally allowed timeframe and remain in the rental unit.

If a tenant fails to pay the past-due amount within the legally allowed timeframe, and remains in the rental unit, the landlord can proceed with the eviction process.

In states where the tenant does not have the ability to avoid eviction through payment of past-due rent, the landlord can proceed with the eviction process if the tenant remains on the property after the notice period expires.

Non-Compliance

An eviction notice form for non-compliance explains that the tenant has violated a term of the rental agreement/lease, or is non-compliant with tenant requirements in the state’s landlord/tenant laws.

Non-compliance issues could range from having a pet in the rental unit when the lease prohibits pets, to causing damage to the rental unit, and even having too many people living in the rental unit.

Some states require the landlord to give tenants an opportunity to cure the violation in order to avoid eviction. In that case, the notice should state that the tenant can avoid eviction by performing specific actions within the legally allowed timeframe and remain in the rental unit.

If a tenant fails to comply with the eviction notice requirements within the legally allowed timeframe, and remains in the rental unit, the landlord can proceed with the eviction process.

In states where the tenant does not have the ability to avoid eviction by curing the violation, the landlord can proceed with the eviction process if the tenant remains on the property after the notice period expires.

Illegal Activity

An eviction notice form for illegal activity explains that the tenant will be evicted for their involvement in some type of illegal activity.

Most states don’t allow a tenant to avoid eviction in this situation, although some states will halt an eviction if the tenant can prove they were not involved in the illegal activity and that they were unaware that their guests or other occupants of the rental unit were involved in illegal activity.

Termination of Tenancy

When a landlord wants to end a tenancy, such as week-to-week or month-to-month, the landlord must typically give tenants notice before evicting them. This can also include tenants without a written lease, periodic tenancies, and/or at-will tenants.

With this type of notice, typically the tenant has done nothing wrong, but the landlord simply doesn’t want to renew the lease/rental agreement for whatever reason.

Typically, this type of notice is not curable, meaning tenants will have to move out.

The amount of time required in the notice may depend on when rent is due (the rental period), the type of tenancy, and/or how long the tenant has lived in the rental unit.