Lockly Secure Smart Lock

Lockly Secure Smart Lock Review

Read time: 10 minutes Last Updated: 10/23/2019

We look at the Lockly Secure Smart Lock and its features and options below. We rate each category on a scale of one to ten, ten being the best. Some categories are weighted more heavily than others based on importance. Check out how this lock scored.

Lockly Secure Smart Lock

Lockly Secure Smart Lock

8/10
  • Battery back-up system
  • Randomized numbers
  • Physical key
  • Wi-fi bridge must be purchased separately
  • Limited smart home integration
  • Limited app functionality
Ease of Use:
Access code entry is fairly simple, app is easy to use
Smart Home Integration:
Alexa, Google Home, Google assistant
Ease of Installation:
A screwdriver and the easy-to-follow instructions
App:
Lockly app
Door Unlocks by:
Via phone, physical key, or entering access code
Remote Access Type:
Bluetooth; wi-fi (if bridge purchased separately)
Power Options:
4 AA batteries, in-app low-battery warning, emergency battery back-up
Lock Type:
Full locking system
Keys or Keyless:
Both options
Warranty:
Limited lifetime on mechanical & finish; 2-year on electronics

Our Review

Overall, the Lockly Secure smart lock earned a 8.0/10 weighted average score.  This is an excellent lock for those who want keyless entry without unnecessary frills and don’t already have a smart home system/aren’t interested in integrating their lock into a smart home system.

This is also a great lock for Airbnb hosts, especially since you can send guests access codes without needing an internet connection, and they won’t need to download an app or create a new account in order to use the access code.  You can also schedule the code to expire after a certain period of time.

For more information about this lock, you can go to the manufacturer’s website here.

Ease of Use

Everyday usage and multiple users

This lock is pretty easy to use.  You simply enter your access code and unlock the door.

Without the optional Wi-Fi bridge, you can only access the lock via the app within Bluetooth range.  With the bridge, you can control the lock from anywhere.

Each code can be set for temporary (one time use) or scheduled use.  Administrative codes have permanent access until deleted.

Adding new users is a fairly simple process, whether you’re creating new codes through the keypad or the Lockly app.

Some users did report that when the lock is installed in direct sunlight, the keypad can be impossible to read, and a few users reported that their keypads failed after prolonged direct exposure in hot weather.

Keep that in mind if your door is in direct sunlight in the summer months, or if you live in a warm climate year-round and the lock will be exposed to direct sunlight.

We also appreciate the fact that you can still use a physical key when needed, and there’s an emergency battery terminal on the outside of the lock, so you never need to worry about getting locked out should the regular batteries die on you.

Although the lock is easy to use, the only way to integrate with a smart home system is to purchase the optional Wi-Fi bridge.

For those reasons, the Lockly Secure gets an 8/10 in the ease of use category.

Smart Home System Integration

Which systems is this smart lock compatible with?

You will need to purchase the Lockly Secure Link Wi-Fi hub to connect to smart home systems/devices.  Once the hub has been installed, the Lockly Secure is compatible with:

  • Google Home
  • Amazon Alexa
  • Google assistant

With both Google assistant and Amazon Alexa, you can use voice commands to lock or unlock the door and check the status of the lock.

However, the Lockly Secure is not compatible with Apple HomeKit, nest, ring, or other smart home systems and devices.

Because this smart lock is compatible with Google Home and Alexa/Google assistant, but not with other smart home systems or devices, it gets a 7/10 here.

Ease of Installation

Installing this smart lock is pretty simple:  you just need a screwdriver. An added bonus: full instructions are included with the lock, and they’re fairly easy to understand.

Once you remove the old lock, following the installation instructions is a breeze.  The online video was easy to follow and showed which parts to use at each step.

There are only a few steps, which we list below to help you make your buying decision.

  1. Install the new deadbolt or locking latch that comes with this lock.
  2. Then install the new strike plate.
  3. Next, install the exterior portion of the lock, then the lock’s mounting plate.
  4. Once those are all in place, connect the cable inside the lock.
  5. Add the back assembly.
  6. Next, while adding three of the batteries, press the button on the back of the inside cover and add the fourth battery.  (The door will then perform the door handing process.)
  7. Once the lock determines which way to turn the deadbolt, you can install the lock’s exterior housing.

That’s it!  Unless you want to connect this lock to your home’s Wi-Fi network, and then you’ll need to plug in the optional Wi-Fi adapter to a nearby outlet.  After that, it’s ready to connect to your home’s network.

One thing to note with this lock, which we had not encountered previously, is the need to add an additional hole in your door in order to stabilize the lock because of its weight.

You can also use the included tape strips, but you must use one of the two options or the lock’s weight could cause it to come loose or pull it off the door completely.

It should be a one-person job, although the lock does weigh about five pounds.

This lock gets a 9/10 on installation because of ease to install, but the weight of the lock may make it hard for some users to install without help.

Robustness of the App

What the app can do and how easy it is to use

In order to access the lock remotely, you will need to purchase the Lockly Secure Link Wi-Fi hub (for an additional $79).  Otherwise, you will only be able to lock and unlock the door through the app if you’re within Bluetooth range.

The app is free and works with both Android phones and iPhones.

Through the Lockly app, you can check the lock’s usage history.  Unfortunately, the app only lets you know when the door was locked or unlocked, and not who accessed the door.

You can also create and delete users and remotely send access codes without needing Wi-Fi.  Another plus is that guests don’t need to download the app themselves or set up any type of account to use the access codes.

You have the ability to add up to 50 access codes, which, while not the best we’ve seen, should be more than enough for most users.  If the optional Wi-Fi bridge is purchased, you’ll have eight additional Wi-Fi only access codes.

Interestingly, the app also allows you to tap on the phone to unlock the door when it senses your phone is outside the lock.

For those reasons, Lockly’s app gets a 7/10 in this category.

Getting In

How this smart lock opens the door

This lock gives you several options for getting in:  by tapping your phone (within Bluetooth range), entering an access code, or using a physical key.

You can also lock or unlock the door remotely via the app when in Bluetooth range, or if you purchase the optional Wi-Fi bridge, you can control the lock from anywhere.

Some users reported that when the lock is in direct sunlight, the screen becomes unreadable, and since the numbers appear in a different order after each use, it’s impossible to tell where to touch the screen to lock/unlock the door.

Because you have the option for a physical key and two other remote access options, the lock gets an 8/10 in this category.

Value

$199-$229 depending on version

The deadbolt version of this lock retails for around $199, and the latch version of the lock retails for $229.  If the optional Wi-Fi bridge is purchased, that becomes $278-$308, making this one of the more expensive smart locks on the market.

You do have the unique feature of the randomized PIN Genie touchpad, which makes it nearly impossible for anyone else to correctly enter your access code.  And, not many smart locks offer you the choice between a locking latch and a deadbolt.

When considering that you have to purchase the optional Wi-Fi hub if you want to use the lock remotely, and even with the hub, it’s only compatible with Alexa and Google Home, this lock isn’t exactly the best value on the market.

Also, unlike its pricier cousins the Secure Pro and Secure Plus, the Lockly Secure does not come with a fingerprint reader.

In addition, while you can lock/unlock the door remotely through the Lockly app, the app isn’t as robust as many other apps on the market, making your options comparatively limited.

Because the lock offers some nice features, but only integrates with Google Home and Alexa if the optional Wi-Fi bridge is purchased, and the app is underwhelming, we gave it a 7.5/10 in the value category.

Remote Connection Type

Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, or Both?

This smart lock uses Bluetooth to connect to your smartphone.

You will need to purchase the Lockly Secure Wi-Fi hub for this smart lock if you want to use it remotely or connect to smart home systems.

One bonus of having the Bluetooth connection is that guests can still receive and enter access codes even without Wi-Fi.

Because you have the option for both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connections, but you need to purchase the bridge separately, we gave the Lockly Secure an 8.5/10 here.                     

Power Options

The Lockly Secure is battery powered and takes four AA batteries, which should have about a one-year lifespan according to the manufacturer.

However, this lock also has a terminal to hook up a 9-volt battery in case the internal batteries die and you need to lock or unlock the door right away.

Battery life information is available in the app only; however, most of the smart locks we reviewed also have a low-battery indicator on the lock itself and not just in the app.

We balanced the cost of replacing four batteries at once (and the frequency of replacing the batteries) against the in-app low-battery warning, and the additional battery back-up for emergencies.

Having the option of a physical key, being able to charge the batteries in an emergency and having the low-battery warning pushes this smart lock to an 8.5/10 in this category.

Lock Type

Lock attachment or full lock?

This is a complete locking system and comes with a full deadbolt assembly or locking latch assembly in addition to the touchpad and other components.  This is considered to be the safest type of smart lock when compared to those that simply attach to an existing lock.

Because of the sturdiness of this lock, and the fact that it’s a full locking system, we gave the Lockly Secure an 8.5/10 here.

Keys or Completely Keyless Entry?

This lock gives you the best of both worlds, by allowing for keyless entry when you want it, while still giving you the option of using a physical key, for those who aren’t ready to toss their house keys just yet.

We gave this lock an 8/10 for having a physical key and two other keyless entry options, plus a battery back-up system.

Warranty

Limited Lifetime/2-year

This lock comes with a decent warranty.  It’s got a limited lifetime warranty on the mechanical parts and finish, and a two-year warranty on the electronic components.

Other smart locks on the market, however, come with three-year warranties on the electronic components.

Because of the decent warranty, the Lockly Secure smart lock earns itself an 8.5/10 here.

Additional Features

This smart lock comes with a randomized keypad, with PIN Genie technology, to randomly display numbers each time you enter an access code.

Numbers on the keypad are shuffled into a different order each time you enter your access code, so they are never in the same order twice in a row, which means anyone watching you enter your code wouldn’t know which numbers are in it.

This technology makes it virtually impossible for someone to guess your access code.

It also has a switch on the lock (inside the door) to turn off the keypad, so you can restrict entry to locking/unlocking remotely through your smartphone or by using the physical key.  Several users reported turning on this setting before going to bed.

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