California Eviction Notice Forms

Last Updated: August 31, 2022 by Marnie Snyder

A California eviction notice form is an official legal document provided to tenants instructing them to comply with the terms of the rental agreement or vacate the premises.  In California, eviction notices are delivered for unpaid rent, lease violations or illegal conduct on property.

Types of California Eviction Notice Forms

Notice Form Grounds Curable?
3 Day Notice to Quit Unpaid Rent Yes
3 Day Notice to Perform Covenants or Vacate Lease Violation Yes
3 Day Notice to Vacate Incurable Breach No
30 Day Notice to Vacate Ending a Tenancy

Less than 1 Year

No
60 Day Notice to Vacate Ending a Tenancy

1 Year or more

No
Lease Termination No Fault Just Cause No Fault Just Cause

(Landlord Only)

No

California 3 Day Notice to Quit

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A California 3 day Notice to Quit form is used for an eviction for nonpayment of rent. The tenant has the option to pay the rent balance due or move out and deliver possession of the premises within three (3) judicial days (not counting weekends and court holidays).

California 3 Day Notice to Perform Covenants or Vacate

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A California 3 Day Notice to Perform Covenants or Vacate form is used for an eviction for lease violations. Examples of lease violations include damaging the rental unit, refusing to allow the landlord access to the premises or failing to maintain the premises in a clean and sanitary manner. The tenant can cure the violation or vacate the premises within three (3) judicial days (not counting weekends or court holidays).

California 3 Day Notice to Vacate

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A California 3 Day Notice to Vacate form is used for an eviction for illegal conduct on the premises, such as possession of illegal drugs or threatening the health and safety of other persons. The tenant cannot remain on the premises and must move out within three (3) judicial days (not counting weekends or court holidays).

California 30 Day Notice to Vacate

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A California 30 Day Notice to Vacate form is used by either party to terminate any tenancy of less than one (1) year, regardless of the rent payment frequency. This lease termination letter may also be used by tenants as a notice of non-renewal of a lease or for tenants with an expired lease. Landlords may also use the 30 Day Notice to Vacate if the rental premises is under a sales contract and meets the provisions specified in the state statute.

Either party must deliver this termination letter at least thirty (30) calendar days prior to the expiration of the lease or the termination date set forth in the notice.

California 60 Day Notice to Vacate

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A California 60 Day Notice to Vacate form may only be used by a landlord if the rental unit meets the legal exemptions under California Law for tenancies of one (1) year or more or for tenants with an expired lease. The tenant may use this notice to terminate a tenancy of one (1) year or more, including a month-to-month lease. This letter must be served by either party at least sixty (60) calendar days prior to the end of the lease or before the termination date set forth in the notice.

California Lease Termination for No Fault Just Cause

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A California Lease Termination for No Fault Just Cause form is used only by landlords, for a tenancy of one (1) year or more, in accordance with the Tenant Protection Act of 2019. The amount of notice required for a landlord to give tenants is at least sixty (60) calendar days.

How a Landlord Uses Lease Termination Notices in California

For at fault just cause (i.e. unpaid rent or lease violations), the landlord shall provide the tenant with an eviction notice rather than a lease termination notice.

For no fault just cause (i.e. substantial remodel or demolition work) in tenancies of one (1) year or more, the landlord should only use the California Lease Termination Notice for No Fault Just Cause

California 30 Day Notice to Vacate

This form is used to terminate a tenancy of less than one (1) year, regardless of the rent payment frequency, in the following situations:

  • If the landlord is ending a tenancy of less than one (1) year, including a month-to-month lease; or
  • If the landlord’s has contracted to sell the rental dwelling with an established escrow and provisions are met under the state statute.

For all tenancy types referenced above with more than one (1) adult household member, the length of the tenancy is based on the tenant that has resided in the rental unit the longest.

The landlord shall deliver the notice to the tenant at least thirty (30) calendar days prior to the termination date set forth in the notice or before the expiration of the lease.

California 60 Day Notice to Vacate

This lease termination form is used to terminate a tenancy of one (1) year or more, regardless of the rent payment frequency, that meet the legal exemptions under the Tenant Protection Act:

  • If the landlord owns and occupies a single family residence, which include the following:
    • A residence in which the owner-occupant rents or leases no more than two units or bedrooms, including, but not limited to, an accessory dwelling unit or a junior accessory dwelling unit; or
    • A mobile home.
  • If the landlord has a property containing two separate dwelling units within a single structure in which the owner occupied one of the units as the owner’s principal place of residence at the beginning of the tenancy, so long as the owner continues in occupancy, and neither unit is an accessory dwelling unit or a junior accessory dwelling unit.
  • If the landlord has housing restricted by deed, regulatory restriction contained in an agreement with a government agency, or other recorded document as affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income.
  • If the landlord has housing that has been issued a certificate of occupancy within the previous 15 years, unless the housing is a mobile home.
  • If the landlord has residential real property, including a mobile home, that is alienable separate from the title to any other dwelling unit, provided that the following apply:
    • The owner is not any of the following: a real estate investment trust, a corporation or an LLC in which at least one member is a corporation.

Landlords shall adhere to local ordinances that require “just cause” to terminate a tenancy as long as the ordinance is more protective than state law.

The landlord shall provide the tenant with the lease termination letter at least sixty (60) calendar days prior to the end date specified in the notice or before the expiration of the lease.

California Lease Termination for No Fault Just Cause

This notice form is used only by landlords to terminate a tenancy of one (1) year or more for the following reasons:

  • If the landlord withdraws the rental property from the housing market;
  • If the landlord or landlord’s immediate family plan to occupy the rental premises;
  • If the landlord is conducting a substantial remodel that will take more than thirty (30) days;
  • If the landlord plans to do demolition work or intends to demolish the premises;
  • If the landlord is complying with a local ordinance; or
  • If the landlord is required to end a tenancy due to an order set forth by a court or government agency relating to habitability.

The amount of notice required for the above no fault just cause reasons is at least sixty (60) calendar days.

The landlord must offer relocation assistance or a rent waiver to tenants to remain in compliance with California law. The rent waiver or the relocation assistance amount is equal to one (1) month of rent.

If the landlord has rental housing in Los Angeles county, all no fault just cause lease termination notices must allow the tenant sixty (60) calendar days to vacate in accordance with the Los Angeles Municipal Code. In addition, the tenant has the first right of return, which gives them an opportunity to move back to the rental unit if they choose before the premises are advertised to any other prospective residents.

How a Tenant Uses Lease Termination Notices in California

California 30 Day Notice to Vacate

This legal letter is used to end a tenancy of less than one (1) year, regardless of the rent payment frequency, for the following reasons:

  • If the tenant is ending any tenancy, including a month-to-month lease; or
  • If the tenant is notifying the landlord of a non-renewal of the lease, regardless of tenancy length.

The tenant must deliver the termination letter to the landlord at least thirty (30) calendar days prior to the expiration of the lease or before the end date specified in the notice.

California 60 Day Notice to Vacate

This lease termination letter is used to end a tenancy of one (1) year or more, regardless of the rent payment frequency, if the tenant is ending any tenancy, including a month-to-month lease.

The tenant must provide the termination letter to the landlord at least sixty (60) calendar days before the termination date or at least sixty (60) calendar days prior to the expiration of the lease.

How to Write an Eviction Notice in California

For an eviction notice to be legally compliant:

  1. List tenants’ full names;
  2. List full address;
  3. Include grounds for eviction;
  4. Calculate and include termination date;
  5. Include date notice served;
  6. The landlord’s signature and printed name; and
  7. The landlord’s address and telephone number.

Without this information on the notice, a judge may not be able to proceed with an eviction proceeding and the landlord’s case may be dismissed.

How to Calculate Expiration Date in California

In California, all eviction notices take effect the day after they are served. During the notice period, only judicial days are counted, so weekends and court holidays are excluded. If the last day of the notice period falls on a weekend or court holiday, then the notice will not officially expire until the end of the next judicial day.

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How to Serve an Eviction Notice in California  

A landlord can deliver notices in California using any of the below acceptable methods:

  1. Handing the notice to the tenant in person;
  2. Handing the notice to a person of suitable age at the property AND mailing the notice by certified or registered mail with a return receipt;
  3. Posting the notice in a conspicuous place at the premises, such as the entry door, AND mailing the notice by certified or registered mail with a return receipt.

When sending the notice by certified or registered mail, add five (5) additional calendar days to the notice period to account for variability in post office delivery times.

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