Connecticut Eviction Notice Forms

Last Updated: December 22, 2021 by Elizabeth Souza

A Connecticut eviction notice form for nonpayment of rent is a written document that states a tenant has 3 days to vacate the premises. Additionally, there are other notice forms for other possible grounds for eviction in Connecticut.

Types of Connecticut Eviction Notices

Each possible ground for eviction has its own notice type. Some notices allow the tenant to fix (“cure”) the issue and continue the tenancy, while others simply state an amount of time to vacate by.

Grounds Time Curable?
Unpaid Rent 3-Day No
Lease Violation 15-Day Yes
Lease Termination 3-Day No
Owner’s Personal Use 3-Day No
Refuse to Accept Rent Increase 3-Day No
Illegal Activity 15-Day No

3-Day Notice to Quit (Nonpayment of Rent)

A landlord is allowed to evict a tenant for failing to pay rent on time.

According to Connecticut law, rent is considered late if it is paid 4 days after the due date for a one-week tenancy, or 9 days after the due date for all other tenancies.

Once rent is past due, the landlord must provide tenants with a 3-Day Notice to Quit if the landlord wants to file an eviction action with the court. This notice gives the tenant 3 days to move out to avoid eviction.

If the tenant remains on the property after the notice period expires, the landlord may proceed with the eviction process.

The Eviction Notice for Nonpayment of Rent should include the total amount of past-due rent owed.

Get the downloadable 3-Day Eviction Notice for Nonpayment of Rent form template below (.pdf direct link).

15-Day Notice to Cure or Vacate (Non-Compliance)

A tenant can be evicted in Connecticut if they do not uphold their responsibilities under the terms of a written lease or rental agreement.

Connecticut landlords must allow tenants to correct a material noncompliance with the lease or rental agreement by providing them with a 15-Day Notice to Comply, giving the tenant 15 days to correct the issue to avoid eviction.

Typical lease violations under this category could include things like damaging the rental property, having too many people reside in the rental unit, having a pet when there’s a no-pet policy, and material health or safety violations.

Examples of material health or safety violations could include letting trash pile up inside the rental unit, providing a harbor for rodents or bugs, and damaging the electrical wiring in the rental unit.

Note that illegal activity is not included in this category.

If the tenant fails to correct the violation and remains on the property after the notice period expires, the landlord may proceed with the eviction process.

The eviction notice must include:

  • The specific lease violation(s);
  • What the tenant can do to remedy the violation; and
  • The date the lease will terminate if the tenant doesn’t comply within the deadline.

Get the downloadable 15-Day Eviction Notice for Noncompliance form template below (.pdf direct link).

3-Day Lease Termination Notice (No Lease/End of Lease)

In the state of Connecticut, if tenants “hold over,” or stay in the rental unit after the rental term has expired, then the landlord must give tenants notice before evicting them. This can include tenants without a written lease and week-to-week and month-to-month tenants.

Regardless of the length or type of tenancy, landlords are required to give all tenants 3 days’ written notice to vacate the rental unit.

If the tenant remains on the property after the notice period expires, the landlord may proceed with the eviction process.

The eviction notice should include the date the tenancy will terminate.

Get the downloadable 3-Day Lease Termination Notice form template below (.pdf direct link).

3-Day Notice to Vacate (Owner’s Personal Use)

If the landlord or owner decides that they no longer want to rent out the unit, and instead want to live in the rental unit themselves, then the landlord must give their tenant 3 days’ written notice to vacate the rental unit.

Tenants do not have an option to remain in the rental unit in these cases and must move out.

If the tenant remains on the property after the notice period expires, the landlord may proceed with the eviction process.

The eviction notice should include the date the tenancy will terminate.

Get the downloadable 3-Day Eviction Notice for Owner’s Personal Use form template below (.pdf direct link).

3-Day Notice to Vacate (Discontinuance of Use)

If the landlord or owner decides that they no longer want to rent out the rental property, and the property is going to sit unused, then the landlord must give their tenants 3 days’ written notice prior to proceeding with the eviction process.

Tenants do not have an option to remain in the rental unit in these cases and must move out.

If the tenant remains on the property after the notice period expires, the landlord may proceed with the eviction process.

The eviction notice should include the date the tenancy will terminate.

Get the downloadable 3-Day Eviction Notice for Discontinuance of Use form template below (.pdf direct link).

3-Day Notice to Vacate (Refusal to Accept Rent Increase)

If tenants in Connecticut refuse to accept a fair, equitable rent increase, landlords may give their tenants 3 days’ written notice to vacate the rental unit.

Tenants do not have an option to remain in the rental unit in these cases and must move out.

If the tenant remains on the property after the notice period expires, the landlord may proceed with the eviction process.

The eviction notice should include the date the tenancy will terminate.

Get the downloadable 3-Day Eviction Notice for Refusal to Accept Rent Increase form template below (.pdf direct link).

15-Day Notice to Quit (Illegal Activity)

Tenants who are involved in illegal activity must be given 15 days’ written notice before the landlord can proceed with an eviction action.

In Connecticut, illegal activity includes:

  • Causing/allowing a nuisance
  • Inflicting/threatening bodily harm on another tenant/landlord
  • Causing substantial, willful property damage
  • Prostitution on the premises
  • Illegal sale of drugs on the premises
  • Endangering the health/safety of other tenants/landlord

No written notice is required if a tenant is convicted of using the rental unit for prostitution or illegal gaming. In these cases, the landlord may file an eviction action without giving tenants prior written notice.

For all other types of illegal activity, if the tenant remains on the property after the notice period expires, the landlord may proceed with the eviction process.

The eviction notice should include:

  • The specific lease violation(s); and
  • The date the tenancy will terminate.

Get the downloadable 15-Day Eviction Notice for Illegal Activity form template below (.pdf direct link).

What to Include in Connecticut Eviction Notices

Under Connecticut law, the eviction notice must contain the following exact language or language that means substantially the same thing as the following:

“I (or we) hereby give you notice that you are to quit possession or occupancy of the (land, building, apartment or dwelling unit, or of any trailer or any land upon which a trailer is used or stands, as the case may be), now occupied by you at (here insert the address, including apartment number or other designation, as applicable)…

“On or before the (here insert the date) for the following reason (here insert the reason or reasons for the notice to quit possession or occupancy using the statutory language or words of similar import, also the date and place of signing notice).”

It may also be a good idea to ensure that the notice also includes the name and contact information of the person being evicted, just to be sure the correct person receives the notice.

The landlord should obtain the tenant’s signature confirming that they received the eviction notice, if the notice was hand-delivered.

Delivering Eviction Notices in Connecticut

In the state of Connecticut, landlords can deliver an eviction notice by one of the following methods:

  • Giving it to the tenant in person;
  • Leaving the notice at the rental unit if the tenant is not available; or
  • Publishing the notice in a local newspaper if the tenant’s current whereabouts are unknown.

Eviction Process in Connecticut

  1. An eviction notice is posted by the landlord to vacate or “cure” the issue.
  2. If the tenant does not vacate when required to do so, a Complaint is filed by the landlord with the county court.
  3. An appearance or response is filed.
  4. A hearing is held and judgment issued.
  5. If an eviction is granted, a Writ of Execution is posted.
  6. Finally, the sheriff returns possession of the property to the landlord.

To learn more about the eviction process in Connecticut, click here.

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