Vermont Month-to-Month Rental Agreement

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The Vermont month-to-month rental agreement documents the terms for the renting of property and details the monthly rent, property description, and tenant’s responsibilities. This document enables either party (tenant or landlord) to alter or terminate the rental agreement on a monthly basis.

A standard lease can be very beneficial, especially when considering features like stability and the legally binding nature of these agreements. That taken into account, these can also be restrictive, and if a landlord or renter opts to break a lease unjustifiably, then there are penalties that come into play. For a more convenient style of lease, many opt to sign a month-to-month agreement, which is sometimes called an at-will lease. These at-will leases have a one-month duration, and as long as the tenant or landlord doesn’t provide notice, then these will automatically renew at the start of the next month. This is useful for renters that don’t want a full-term lease or for landlords that are only seeking to rent out a property for a truncated period.

Vermont Requirements for a Month-to-Month Lease Termination

If either the landlord or his or her tenant wants to make the premises vacant, then he or she must provide a notification that’s equal to the rental period. This means that either party will need to let the other party know their intent within a one-month period. The nature of an at-will lease states clearly that neither party must give cause for this, so once the notification is furnished, the unit must be made vacant at the end of the 30 days.

Raising the Rent in Vermont

Based on Vermont Title 9 Chapter 137 § 4455, the landlord must provide a tenant with at least 60 days of notice before raising the rent for a month-to-month tenancy. When under the protections of an at-will lease, the landlord cannot raise the rent until the lease has run its term unless there is a provision in the original lease. When raising the rent, Vermont doesn’t have a law that regulates how much a landlord can raise the rent or how often as long as the 60-day notice period has been provided for at-will tenancies.