Arkansas Month-to-Month Rental Agreement

Grab our free sample or generate an official Arkansas month-to-month rental agreement for residential use. Read further about required disclosures in Arkansas, optional addendums for things like pets, and how much notice is needed to terminate month-to-month leases in Arkansas.

OFFICIAL RENTAL AGREEMENT
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What is a Arkansas Month-to-Month Lease?

With a standard lease, there is typically a lease term in which both the landlord and his or her lessee are bound. These have a good level of stability, but for those with the need for more temporary housing, they can be restrictive because breaking a lease comes with penalties. Instead, a month-to-month lease is an at-will agreement has a single month as its term. This opens up possibilities for tenants that don’t want a fixed-term lease or landlords that are only looking to rent for a preset period.

Arkansas Requirements for a Month-to-Month Lease Termination

With a month-to-month lease, either the lessee or lessor can end the lease when the need strikes them without providing the other party with cause. According to Arkansas state statute § 18-17-704(b), this must be furnished within the 30 days before the one-month termination date of the lease (month-to-month leases terminate and renew monthly). This notice provides the lessee time to find a new place to stay and the lessor time to find new tenants if that’s what he or she wants. For both the tenant and landlord, it’s a good idea to furnish this notice in person or via certified mail so that receipt is verified.

Raising the Rent in Arkansas

Unlike some other states, Arkansas doesn’t have communities with rent control, so state law doesn’t provide a limit on how much a landlord can raise the rent for a tenant. This means that the landlord can raise a month-to-month tenant’s rent by whatever value he or she chooses. Also, Arkansas doesn’t have a statute on the books prescribing a notification time for rent raises on month-to-month tenancies. That being said, in most cases, landlords will provide the lease term’s duration before raising the rent – in this case, a month’s worth of notice.